Trump

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the press on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, before boarding Marine One for a short trip to Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump is traveling to North Carolina and Florida. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if "Obamacare" is ruled unconstitutional.

Eager to get conservative Judge Amy Coney Barrett quickly confirmed to the Supreme Court, which is hearing his challenge to the Affordable Care Act, Trump asserts that "far cheaper" and "much better" plans will replace the Obama-era law. He also points to a new executive order offering protections. But his claims are illusory.

Various GOP bills, in fact, have been seen over the years as providing less than what "Obamacare" already provided, and it's unlikely an executive order will have much effect.

In a momentous past week, Trump painted a fantastical portrait of a coronavirus that affects "virtually nobody" among the young as he faced a grim U.S. milestone of 200,000 deaths and he asserted a constitutional basis that doesn't exist for rushing a replacement for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Meanwhile, with the first presidential debate on Tuesday, Democratic presidential rival Joe Biden botched details about the pivotal Supreme Court vacancy and exaggerated his early statements on COVID-19.

A look at recent rhetoric, also covering voting fraud and racial progress:

Associated Press writers Mark Sherman, Jessica Gresko, Jill Colvin, Kevin Freking and Darlene Superville in Washington, Nicholas Riccardi in Denver, Bill Barrow in Atlanta and Carla K. Johnson in Seattle contributed to this report.

The Associated Press has been fact-checking politicians since 1996, when Bill Clinton was president. These are not opinion pieces but instead are straight-news items that adhere to AP's Statement of News Values. The AP encourages readers to reach out with comments, fact-checking suggestions and corrections at FactCheck@ap.org. Learn more about the team and how this content is produced at apnews.com.

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